The goslings have hatched!

We have successfully incubated Uncle Waldo and Abigail’s first set of eggs!  Four goslings were set to hatch today, and they all made it out of the shell, although one needed a little help. One more will hatch in two days, we hope.

Two days ago I noticed when I candled their eggs that they had internally pipped into the air cell. Yesterday evening when I got home from work they had all started to externally pip through the shell:

The penciled-in cross shows where the air cell dipped down to:

This morning they had enlarged their pip holes quite a bit.

First one out!

It’s lonely being the first one out, so she cuddled around her sibling’s egg to take a nap while waiting:

They slowly worked their egg tooth around in a circle to create a hinge at the top of the blunt end of the egg:

One little head poking out of an egg:

The empty egg shell:

This little guy just wasn’t making much progress so we gingerly began to crack away little bits of the eggshell.  I put him back in the incubator like this and he made the rest of the trip out by himself:

We made a video of one popping out of the shell:

Everyone is now snug in the brooder:

The two girls have the dark grey bills; the boys have pink bills.

ABIGAIL WENT BROODY!!

Abigail, our 11-month-old Pilgrim goose

I just cannot believe our good fortune!  God certainly is blessing us in the poultry area at the moment.

She’d built her nest awhile ago and had been laying an egg in it every other day.  I collected some for the incubator and had been storing the rest in the basement because the nights have still been dropping below freezing and she wasn’t sitting yet.

But today I put those eight eggs back in her nest because it isn’t supposed to freeze again, and shortly thereafter she commenced sitting!

I was surprised that Uncle Waldo wasn’t with her and is instead spending this lovely sunny spring day out on the pond.

He kept close tabs on me while I was busy planting a new Stanley plum tree and a Red Haven peach tree, but he didn’t try to attack me.

I put food and a bucket of water in the duck-n-goose house with Abigail and quietly closed the door to keep the chickens from pestering her, as they seemed determined to do.

Here is some helpful information about broody geese from Domestic Geese by Dr. Chris Ashton:

“More females are lost in spring through lack of care than at any other time. It is essential to make a note of the date when the goose first sat seriously, both for the sake of her health and that of the goslings. Females that have been left to sit for more than 32 days off and find it very difficult to revive their appetite, and sometimes die.

First of all, the goose and gander should be wormed when she is definitely broody. The gander also tends to lose his appetite when the goose is sitting. The advantage of worming for the goose is that she does not lose so much condition while she is sitting and, if she becomes ill, one possible cause of disease is eliminated. Also, both birds will be free of worms when they lead the goslings out.

 The goose must be fed and watered once a day. This should not be too hurried an affair, as she will want to carefully cover her eggs with down, so that they remain warm in the nest for some time and are camouflaged. Wheat in a bucket of water is suitable, and the goose should be encouraged to swim if the weather is hot and dry, as this will give the eggs the correct amount of moisture.

If the birds are tame, the feeding and watering procedure is not a problem, as a tame goose will allow you to look at the eggs and left her off the nest, and a tame gander will not attack. In these circumstances, a goose can be fed twice a day if she is losing too much condition. With fierce birds it is much more problematical, and it is best to drive the gander to a place out of the way when you want to drive the goose off the nest, otherwise smashed eggs will result. Geese that are accustomed to sitting will probably look after themselves, but you must check. Young birds need more attention because they have not been through this process before, and can become very run down by sitting too tightly.” (Ashton, pp 131-133).

Provided she stays on the nest and the eggs are viable, the goslings should hatch on May 8th!

Prepping for goslings to hatch

I never thought we would get this far since Pilgrim goose eggs are notoriously difficult to incubate, but right now I have five eggs that are five days out from hatching and all are showing signs of life! So, it’s time to set things up for hatchlings…

Some folks brood their baby poultry right in the house, but we prefer to keep them out in the garage. We have a set of metal shelves set up with plastic totes that Phil has modified by cutting out the top, making a wood frame around the opening, and attaching hardware cloth to protect the babies from any chipmunks or mice that might get into the garage and to protect them from the possibility of a brooder heat lamp falling onto them and burning them.

The shelves in this unit are made of heavy duty wire from which we can hang the brooder heat lamps. The shelves can be moved up and down if we need the lamps closer or further away than the cord will allow.

Last spring we brooded purchased ducks and goslings and found that large wood shavings were the best bedding in the brooder boxes.

However, for the first couple of days post-hatch, when goslings are still figuring out what food is, you don’t want them to have access to the wood shavings because they will eat them and develop an impacted crop. For that reason, I have covered the wood shavings with puppy pads which I will remove once the goslings are eating well.

I have purchased unmedicated starter crumbles for them.  It is imperative not to feed crumbles that have been medicated with amprolium to waterfowl. They consume a great deal more feed then chicks do and will receive too high a dose of amprolium. Besides that, they aren’t especially prone to coccidiosis, so there really is no need for medicated feed.

Commercially prepared feed is insufficient in niacin for waterfowl. Their legs will not develop correctly without supplementing with brewers yeast. Additionally, I have purchased some small packets of electrolytes and probiotics to get them off to a good start. After a few days, I will put out a little dish of chick grit for them and begin feeding them small amounts of chopped fresh herbs and grass.  I started various herb seeds in window boxes next to my catalpa tree seedlings:

There are differing strains of thought on the protein level that is best for goslings; we follow Metzer’s recommendation and keep the protein between 20-24%.

Finally, I washed up some little feeders and waterers and placed them on a small wire rack to elevate them slightly so that the goslings don’t kick their soiled bedding into their feed and water.

Today is Day 25 of 30, and we are all ready and waiting with bated breath to see if any babies will hatch on Wednesday next week!