Rejoicing over the lost and found.

Thiry Farm

So many times I think to myself how interesting life on our little hobby farm is and how I ought to get back to writing about all the odd and fascinating happenings, but busyness kept me from it and then it seemed awkward just to start writing again.

But there is nothing like the thrill of new eggs to get me excited and wanting to tell the story…

In June, we received a shipment of 15 Midget White turkey poults, five of whom died within 48 hours before I figured out they must have arrived carrying coccidiosis. One of the girls and I fairly flew to Tractor Supply for a package of Corvid, and the other ten poults lived and thrived.

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Then December came and five of the surplus toms flew off to freezer camp, and I have to say they were emotionally the hardest of all the poultry to…

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Memorial Day happenings on Thiry Farm

The rest of my family flew to Chicago this weekend to see the musical Hamilton. I had to stay home because…

Well, hop on over to Thiry Farm and see what’s happening around our place today!

Ducklings and goslings update

We have plenty of baby poultry in progress around here.

I hatched out some mutt ducks  at school for the kiddos to observe:

 

Today an incubator full of Pilgrim goslings is working on hatching:

Scrambles, our Buff Orpington hen, and Violet, one of our Australorps, both went broody and are sitting on Indian Runner duck eggs and Pilgrim goose eggs:

Abigail, our Pilgrim goose, went broody a while ago but then left her nest. I put those eggs in the incubator to finish hatching; however, she laid a new clutch in a nest she built under the duck house and now is sitting quite seriously.  I think she may actually finish the job this time!

In a few weeks when work winds down for the year I will resume posting here more regularly. I also have started a new blog related solely to our farm:

Thiry Farm

 

 

The goslings have hatched!

We have successfully incubated Uncle Waldo and Abigail’s first set of eggs!  Four goslings were set to hatch today, and they all made it out of the shell, although one needed a little help. One more will hatch in two days, we hope.

Two days ago I noticed when I candled their eggs that they had internally pipped into the air cell. Yesterday evening when I got home from work they had all started to externally pip through the shell:

The penciled-in cross shows where the air cell dipped down to:

This morning they had enlarged their pip holes quite a bit.

First one out!

It’s lonely being the first one out, so she cuddled around her sibling’s egg to take a nap while waiting:

They slowly worked their egg tooth around in a circle to create a hinge at the top of the blunt end of the egg:

One little head poking out of an egg:

The empty egg shell:

This little guy just wasn’t making much progress so we gingerly began to crack away little bits of the eggshell.  I put him back in the incubator like this and he made the rest of the trip out by himself:

We made a video of one popping out of the shell:

Everyone is now snug in the brooder:

The two girls have the dark grey bills; the boys have pink bills.

ABIGAIL WENT BROODY!!

Abigail, our 11-month-old Pilgrim goose

I just cannot believe our good fortune!  God certainly is blessing us in the poultry area at the moment.

She’d built her nest awhile ago and had been laying an egg in it every other day.  I collected some for the incubator and had been storing the rest in the basement because the nights have still been dropping below freezing and she wasn’t sitting yet.

But today I put those eight eggs back in her nest because it isn’t supposed to freeze again, and shortly thereafter she commenced sitting!

I was surprised that Uncle Waldo wasn’t with her and is instead spending this lovely sunny spring day out on the pond.

He kept close tabs on me while I was busy planting a new Stanley plum tree and a Red Haven peach tree, but he didn’t try to attack me.

I put food and a bucket of water in the duck-n-goose house with Abigail and quietly closed the door to keep the chickens from pestering her, as they seemed determined to do.

Here is some helpful information about broody geese from Domestic Geese by Dr. Chris Ashton:

“More females are lost in spring through lack of care than at any other time. It is essential to make a note of the date when the goose first sat seriously, both for the sake of her health and that of the goslings. Females that have been left to sit for more than 32 days off and find it very difficult to revive their appetite, and sometimes die.

First of all, the goose and gander should be wormed when she is definitely broody. The gander also tends to lose his appetite when the goose is sitting. The advantage of worming for the goose is that she does not lose so much condition while she is sitting and, if she becomes ill, one possible cause of disease is eliminated. Also, both birds will be free of worms when they lead the goslings out.

 The goose must be fed and watered once a day. This should not be too hurried an affair, as she will want to carefully cover her eggs with down, so that they remain warm in the nest for some time and are camouflaged. Wheat in a bucket of water is suitable, and the goose should be encouraged to swim if the weather is hot and dry, as this will give the eggs the correct amount of moisture.

If the birds are tame, the feeding and watering procedure is not a problem, as a tame goose will allow you to look at the eggs and left her off the nest, and a tame gander will not attack. In these circumstances, a goose can be fed twice a day if she is losing too much condition. With fierce birds it is much more problematical, and it is best to drive the gander to a place out of the way when you want to drive the goose off the nest, otherwise smashed eggs will result. Geese that are accustomed to sitting will probably look after themselves, but you must check. Young birds need more attention because they have not been through this process before, and can become very run down by sitting too tightly.” (Ashton, pp 131-133).

Provided she stays on the nest and the eggs are viable, the goslings should hatch on May 8th!

Candling goose eggs with intact and detached air cells.

Here is a video I made to show what goose eggs with intact and detached air cells look like:

This is my first time hatching goslings with detached air cells, so I did quite a bit of research on how to manage this. Here is what I believe is the best process for trying to repair a damaged air cell:

First, wash the eggs with warm (not hot) water if they have been contaminated with a broken egg in the box. Otherwise, don’t wash them if possible.

Second, candle the eggs to inspect for hairline cracks. You can rub a little bit of wax over hairline cracks to seal them.

Third, store eggs upright with the large, blunt end facing up and the narrow end facing down in a cool room for 24 hours. This allows scattered air bubbles to move back up where they belong.

Fourth, put the eggs in the incubator upright, in a vertical position, as opposed to laying them horizontally as one normally does with goose eggs. Do not touch them for 48 hours. No turning!

Fifth, after 48 hours in the incubator, begin turning the eggs from side to side but keep them at a 45° angle upright. You want that air cell to reform at the top of the blunt end as the chorioallantoic membrane forms around the inside of the shell.

By day 15, the air cell may be resealed at the top. If so, you can move the egg into a more horizontal position, keeping the blunt end slightly elevated.