“Give them the chance, and they will burn it all down around them”

If there is a topic I care less about than video games, I can’t think of what it would be, so I almost didn’t read this post.  However, I’m really glad I did:

The problem is that the amenable authorities think their best interests are served by pandering to the SJWs who put them in their untenable position in the first place rather than jettisoning them at the earliest opportunity. What every leader of an organization needs to understand is that the SJWs within have no loyalty to the organization nor do they harbor any concerns for it. The organization is only of interest to them insofar as it provides them with a vehicle for pushing their Narrative.

Give them the chance, and they will burn it all down around them in the interest of virtue-signaling without even a moment’s hesitation. And then they’ll move on to their next victim.

Social Justice Warriors are just infected with a more virulent strain of the liberalism that infects us all to one degree or another.  That is why the quote above is useful in many contexts outside gaming and dealing with SJWs.  That is why when I read it, I did not think of a purple-haired feminist with a game controller in her hands, but rather a woman standing at the head of a church:

“I have a female friend who is theologically trained, gifted, caring, and getting ordained in a mainline denomination. Yet, in her church, as men around her were asked to preach, lead, and be formed as pastors, she felt frozen out—her pastor never allowed her into the life and ministry of her church. When I questioned my friend and another (male) leader about it, they said the same thing: Though the pastor was, by category, a “pro-woman egalitarian,” the reality is that he developed an unexamined habit of disempowering and marginalizing women around him. His egalitarian label actually served as a way to self-justify and leave deeper sexism unexamined. This could be dismissed as a mere personality conflict, except that it happens so often—I know similar stories from women all over the country.

In the other camp, complementarians can spend their energy arguing for male leadership while neglecting pressing problems of sexism in their midst. A pastor friend told me recently that working alongside a woman in lay ministry convicted him that he had ignored voices of women in his congregation, where pastor and elder roles are reserved for men. He is now trying to actively repent by meeting with female congregants to ask them about their experiences, including women in all church decisions, and learning about the history and current reality of sexism. He’s working to make voices and gifts of women a priority, even while maintaining his stance against female ordination.

If one professes male headship, then it is particularly important to rigorously disentangle that view from sins of sexism and cultural misogyny. Otherwise, complementarianism can become a mere façade to “baptize” the dehumanization of women and self-centeredness of men. It isn’t enough to merely argue for male headship without also asking how to create a church culture where women thrive. All churches and church leaders—on both sides of the issue—must actively seek the flourishing of women and explicitly condemn mocking, belittling, or denigrating women as unbiblical.”

I hope that Vox, whose blog I read daily even though I sometimes disagree with him, will not mind if I borrow his quote and extrapolate it:

The problem is that Christian men think the Church’s best interests are served by pandering to the usurping women who put them in their untenable position in the first place rather than jettisoning them at the earliest opportunity. What every male leader of a church needs to understand is that the women “leaders” within have no loyalty to the church nor do they harbor any concerns for it. The church is only of interest to them insofar as it provides them with a vehicle for pushing their Narrative.

Give them the chance, and they will burn it all down around them in the interest of feminist rebellion without even a moment’s hesitation. And then they’ll move on to their next victim.

Men suppose that women just want this or that one thing and then it will be enough and they will satisfied and that will be that.  No.  It is never enough with such women.  The authoress is a “pastor”.  Her friend is becoming ordained.  Was it enough?  No!  It is never enough. She tells you so plainly:

All churches and church leaders…must actively seek the flourishing of women

It will only be enough when everything in the church is always all about women all of the time.  And then the church will become pointless and everyone will leave, as has happened to so many churches already.  And then such women move on to their next victim church.

Give them the chance and they will burn it all down around them.

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9 thoughts on ““Give them the chance, and they will burn it all down around them”

  1. “Men suppose that women just want this or that one thing and then it will be enough and they will satisfied and that will be that. No. It is never enough with such women. The authoress is a “pastor”. Her friend is becoming ordained. Was it enough? No! It is never enough. She tells you so plainly:”

    my bff and i were just talking about this last week.

    speaking in generalities …

    if you give women just a little ‘out,’ they’ll take it and spread it open wider and wider and wider until someone says stop. this is hard for many men to understand b/c if you give a man a little, they just take it and move on. but women are often not content with the little or the much, regardless of what they have, they always want more.

    not only do women want more, but they’re born master manipulators, esp of men, and they’ll use all they’ve got to get what they want.

    most men when given something, simply take it and move on to the next thing.

    not women. women take it, dwell upon it, think on it some more, try to figure out how to adapt or change or reorganize … manipulate … it. and then if they like it, they try to figure out how to get more.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reading the part about the woman “pastor” feeling disenfranchised by her supposedly egalitarian church, I’m not totally sure how to take that. Everything seems to serve the narrative, so is the question really whether she did or did not get her turn, or rather that she wasn’t getting her share of the turns (75% of course), or….? I’ve had an interaction or two where no matter what I did, it “proved” I was a sexist. Whatever. My favorite was in building for Habitat for Humanity–I saw how something needed to be straightened and worked to coordinate it, and what I got from one person who’d been looking at the situation a while was that I was trying to organize things just so I could dominate it.

    Um, no, we’d just been trying various ways that didn’t work a while, and I figured out what would–it’s what we engineers are supposed to do, donchaknow?

    But more directly to the point, I’ve been leery of anyone who wants to be “empowered” for a while, really for the same reason our hostess notes in her first comment; Christ came to serve. If you clamor for power, all you’ve done is prove that you’ve missed one of the main points of the Gospel.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. 1 Kings 3:

    23 And the king said, “The one says, ‘This is my son, who lives, and your son is the dead one’; and the other says, ‘No! But your son is the dead one, and my son is the living one.’” 24 Then the king said, “Bring me a sword.” So they brought a sword before the king. 25 And the king said, “Divide the living child in two, and give half to one, and half to the other.”

    26 Then the woman whose son was living spoke to the king, for she yearned with compassion for her son; and she said, “O my lord, give her the living child, and by no means kill him!”

    But the other said, “Let him be neither mine nor yours, but divide him.”

    27 So the king answered and said, “Give the first woman the living child, and by no means kill him; she is his mother.”

    28 And all Israel heard of the judgment which the king had rendered; and they feared the king, for they saw that the wisdom of God was in him to administer justice.

    Women willing to ‘burn it all down’ since biblical times. “If I can’t have it my way, then let it burn.”. Until men in society, and the church, grow a pair and tell these troublemakers to sit down and shut up it will be akin to the Springfield tire fire, burning and burning with no end in sight (except for during the Olympics!).

    Liked by 3 people

  4. Being secular, I should say anything but, this has progressed pretty far. It may be that most churches won’t recover.
    To take it out of a
    Chritian perspective, I ran across a woman who claimed to be a rabbi. She had no idea why the University of Ohio had to destroy their replica of the Ark of the Covenant.
    Hint: it’s dangerous.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have to add this to lighten the thread. In this clip, our hero utter the immortal line, “Truck? What truck?”

      “Nazis, I hate those guys!”

      Liked by 2 people

  5. Pingback: Churchianity is a veneer of self righteousness | Christianity and the manosphere

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